Photo: Anna Patrick/100 Days in Appalachia

The Department of Family and Community Health at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, located in Huntington, West Virginia, is leading a new community health worker program. The program targets high-risk patients that have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in rural areas throughout Appalachia. Rather than relying on regular doctor’s visits to treat diseases like diabetes, which are largely impacted by a patient’s daily decisions, the model moves care upstream into the homes of patients to create opportunities for intervention on a weekly basis.  It’s a new version of a well-known, widely used model that employs community members, without requiring a medical background, to support the health of others. The Department of Family and Community Health at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, located in Huntington, West Virginia, is leading the program’s implementation.

100 Days in Appalachia
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For more information, click https://www.100daysinappalachia.com/2019/06/05/moving-care-upstream-appalachian-community-health-workers-take-on-diabetes-and-get-results/

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